Variables That Influence Traumatic Reactions in Child Maltreatment

After a traumatic event, common with abuse, maltreatment, or neglect, the psychological outcomes can leave lasting damage. Although the experience and the individual make each response unique, there are some determinants to how some victims react to traumatic events, especially in cases of child maltreatment. Below, and outlined in our Mental Health Issues of Child Maltreatment textbook, are some variables that affect the reactions to these events.

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Resiliency and Risk Factors in Child Maltreatment

In the wake of experiencing child maltreatment, children and adolescents have to make their way back to normalcy in a pace that works for them. Their resiliency, among other things, aids those affected by child maltreatment, or any other form of abuse, violence, or maltreatment. Resiliency gets them to a state of being that creates a feeling of safety and security with their surroundings and with themselves. This blog post will go over what ensures positive steps forward, as outlined in our Mental Health Issues of Child Maltreatment textbook.Read More »

Behaviors Developed from Abuse: Internalizing and Externalizing

Experiencing or being exposed to a traumatic event–including abuse, violence, maltreatment, or neglect–can have the potential to cause significant psychological problems. When this is the case, which is fairly common among victims in one way or another, negative psychological sequelae can be considered internalized or externalized. As outlined in our Mental Health Issues of Child Maltreatment textbook, this post will examine the prevalence of conditions that fall within one of the two categories of psychological sequelae.Read More »

The Traumatic Nature of Sexual Assault

For sexual assault victims, the amount of time it takes to recover cannot be calculated. Sexual assault affects the victim in different aspects, including physically, mentally, and socially. Some aspects of a person’s character take longer to repair than others. After an assault or any other type of traumatic experience, the victim has to readjust nearly every part of who they are. To better aid victims in the recovery process, it is important to understand the trauma caused by sexual assault and how it is developed.Read More »

Utah Bill Could Make Treatment Optional for Perpetrators of Domestic Violence

Bill SB 206, being proposed in Utah, would serve to make changes to the release procedure of prisoners convicted of domestic violence, including forcing them to sign away rights to contact the victim upon release from prison.  The bill seems to have good chances of passing, however one small change could make a huge difference in how domestic violence cases are prosecuted, and many domestic violence advocates feel it would be a step in the wrong direction.Read More »

Coping Mechanisms of Children of Uxoricide

It is estimated that nearly 3,000 children in the United States each year are affected by Uxoricide, murder of an intimate partner, because the victim, the perpetrator, or both are their parents.  While the affects of uxoricide on the victim’s and/or perpetrator’s children are similar to those experienced by a child of any murdered parent, there are additional traumas experienced by the children of Uxoricide, most importantly that most cases end either in a murder/suicide or in incarceration of the guilty parent.  In either of these cases the child loses both parents at once and this is especially traumatic.  We have a complete chapter on Children of Uxoricide in our comprehensive guide to Mental Health Issues of Child Maltreatment including a section on the effective and ineffective coping mechanisms of these children.Read More »

House Supports Bill to Defend Veteran Sexual Assault Survivors

We have spoken before about how abuse and sexual assault can cause PTSD in domestic violence survivors, but victims of intimate partner violence are not the only ones suffering from the disorder following sexual assault.  A bill supported by the House of Representatives as of Monday would force the Department of Veteran’s Affairs to identify sexual assault as a cause of mental illness in the military.Read More »

PTSD and Intimate Partner Violence

When the media, treatment programs, and the general public address issues of domestic violence, it is common that the focus remains on physical abuse alone.  While physical abuse is incredibly harmful and is indeed one important issue in domestic violence, studies have proven that other types of abuse not involving physical harm can be just a psychologically damaging and disturbingly common.  Read More »